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Sep

11

Medications For Alcoholism

Posted By: wbhazel1 on September 11, 2011 at 10:44 am

http://video.aol.com/video-detail/alcoholism-medications/1980437656

Medications which help with curbing alcohol dependence in this short video three common drugs are discussed which essentially serve to block or negate the effects of alcohol, otherwise removing the pleasure and therefore the urge to drink. The medications listed must be prescribed by a physician, preferably a psychiatrist and are best utilized in conjunction with ongoing therapy with a trained (LICENSED and/or Board CERTIFIED Counselor). The short definitions of these popular medications are as follows:

1.  Disulfiram: is a drug used to support the treatment of chronic alcoholism by producing an acute sensitivity to alcohol. Trade names for disulfiram in different countries are Antabuse and Antabus manufactured by Odyssey Pharmaceuticals. Disulfiram is also being studied as a treatment for cocaine dependence, as it prevents the breakdown of dopamine (a neurotransmitter whose release is stimulated by cocaine); the excess dopamine results in increased anxiety, higher blood pressure, restlessness and other unpleasant symptoms. Several studies have reported that it has anti-protozoal activity as well.[1][2] 

Research for possible disulfiram use in cancer therapy has been announced. The key feature of this drug which is taken orally is after taking this drug until a therapeutic dose is in your body approximately ten days is if you drink any quantity of alcohol you will get violently ill. This is to say you will throw up and be in a great deal of discomfort often necessitating a trip to your local emergency room.

2. Naltrexone is an opioid receptor antagonist used primarily in the management of alcohol dependence and opioid dependence. It is marketed in generic form as its hydrochloride salt, naltrexone hydrochloride, and marketed under the trade names Revia and Depade. In some countries including the United States, a once-monthly extended-release injectable formulation is marketed under the trade name Vivitrol. Also in the US, Methylnaltrexone Bromide, a closely related drug, is marketed as Relistor, for the treatment of opioid induced constipation.

Naltrexone should not be confused with naloxone (which is used in emergency cases of overdose rather than for longer-term dependence control) nor nalorphine. Both nalorphine and naloxone are full antagonists and will treat an opioid overdose, but naltrexone is longer-acting than naloxone (although neither is an irreversible antagonist like naloxazone), making naloxone a better emergency antidote.

Naltrexone is sometimes used for rapid detoxification (“rapid detox”) regimens for opioid dependence. The principle of rapid detoxification is to induce opioid-receptor blockage while the patient is in a state of impaired consciousness, so as to attenuate the withdrawal symptoms experienced by the patient. It serves to block the pleasure that the alcoholic or addict seeks when using their drug of choice and lets be real Alcohol IS a DRUG!. This drug additionally serves to reverse the effects of the drink or drug taken previously. In other words if you are drunk or high in many cases administration of this drug will immediately take away your high or inebriation.

3.Acamprosate, also known as N-acetyl homotaurine[2] and by the brand name Campral, is a drug used for treating alcohol dependence. Acamprosate is thought to stabilize the chemical balance in the brain that would otherwise be disrupted by alcoholism, possibly by blocking glutamatergic N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors, while gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) type A
receptors are activated.[3]

Reports indicate that acamprosate only works with a combination of attending support groups and abstinence from alcohol.[4][5]  Certain serious side effects include diarrhea, allergic reactions, irregular heartbeats, and low or high blood pressure, while less serious side effects include headaches, insomnia, and impotence.[6] Acamprosate should not be taken by people with kidney problems or allergies to the drug.[7]

This is an extremely helpful video which discusses medications often used in treating patients with alcohol or other drug dependency issues. This is not to say that they should be used as a first resort in treatment as particularly with Alcoholics detoxification which occurs NOT under medical supervision (MEDICAL DOCTOR) could be life threatening.

To help the patient wishing to detox from alcohol or other drugs it is IMPERATIVE that the patient be seen by a medical doctor to supervise the actual withdrawal. After the patient is safely detoxed they are then able to be released to trained counselors who can provide necessary therapy and psychosocial support.

Remember if you are playing a sport and break a bone the first order of business is to apply first aid, then removal to the emergency room and ultimately to the specialist who will bring you back to full health. In alcohol and other drug treatment the pattern is the same. At team approach where the patient’s medical, mental health, environmental, spiritual and emotional needs can all be met.

Some of the definitions were taken directly from Wikipedia in order to provide the names of the manufacturer and chemical composition. The rest is my hopefully helpful advice. For any further information, or follow up discussion please contact me directly so that I can explain how this may apply to your unique situation.

    Filed Under: Abuse , Addiction Therapy , Agoraphobia Therapy , Anger , Anger Management , Anxiety / Stress , Anxiety Therapy , Bereavement-Grief , Bipolar Therapy , BPD Therapy , CBT , Depression , Depression Therapy , Difficult Emotions , Family Treatment , Group Treatment , Identity Issues , Individual Treatment , Insomnia Therapy , Low Self Esteem , Marriage & Relationship , Marriage and Family Therapist , Mood Fluctuation , OCD Therapy , Panic Attack Therapy , Parenting , Pre-Marital Counseling , Professional Counselor , Psychiatry , Psychology , PTSD / Trauma , Reality , REBT , Relationship Problems , Social Phobia Treatment , Social Work , Speech Anxiety , Treatment modality , Trust Issues , Uncategorized , Unresolved Childhood Issues , Violence , Work Related Issues
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