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Sep

30

Putting the Caped Crusader on the Couch

Posted By: wbhazel1 on September 30, 2011 at 10:08 am

Here is an article that reviews how some forms of mental illness have been portrayed in comic books over the last half century.

How have they been helpful or harmful to how society views those with diagnosed or diagnosable conditions?

Let’s begin the dialogue.

Putting the Caped Crusader on the Couch

    Filed Under: Abuse , Addiction Therapy , Agoraphobia Therapy , Anger , Anger Management , Anxiety / Stress , Anxiety Therapy , Bereavement-Grief , Bipolar Therapy , BPD Therapy , CBT , Depression , Depression Therapy , Difficult Emotions , Family Treatment , Group Treatment , Identity Issues , Individual Treatment , Insomnia Therapy , Low Self Esteem , Marriage & Relationship , Marriage and Family Therapist , Mood Fluctuation , OCD Therapy , Panic Attack Therapy , Parenting , Professional Counselor , Psychiatry , Psychology , PTSD / Trauma , Reality , REBT , Relationship Problems , Social Phobia Treatment , Social Work , Speech Anxiety , Treatment modality , Trust Issues , Unresolved Childhood Issues , Violence , Work Related Issues
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Sep

29

Sigmund Freud’s Cocaine Years

Posted By: wbhazel1 on September 29, 2011 at 1:02 pm

This is a book review profiled in The New York Times Sunday Book Review.

I always find it fascinating to learn about the pioneers of modern day psychotherapy and what factors shaped their perceptions.

For more modern day professionals what influences us?

Sigmund Freud’s Cocaine Years

    Filed Under: Abuse , Addiction Therapy , Anxiety / Stress , Anxiety Therapy , Depression , Depression Therapy , Difficult Emotions , Identity Issues , Individual Treatment , Low Self Esteem , Mood Fluctuation , Panic Attack Therapy , Professional Counselor , Psychiatry , Psychology , Reality , Social Work , Treatment modality , Trust Issues
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Sep

29

How to Overcome Panic and Anxiety

Posted By: Mike Sanderson on September 29, 2011 at 10:43 am

Any individual that has ever experienced a panic attack will know how life threatening these sensations can feel. A panic attack can significantly hurt your standard of living by making you become scared of a another episode. This apprehension is yet another negative complication of panic attacks, and you must learn to think about it as such so you can get on with your life without the continuous fear of a panic attack lingering over your head. Fretting about having a panic attack all the time might even make you trigger panic attacks later on.

Panic attacks feel a lot like coronaries. A panic attack may possibly cause your heart to quicken, and it'd lead you to become short of breath. You might realize that you feel dizzy or lightheaded, and they're characterized with the feeling of life or death seriousness. It isn't odd to imagine that you're dying or about to die when you're having a panic episode. Happily for sufferers, they're often not of a long duration, and will stop when they have run their course, sometimes a minute or two, or when the reason for the panic is removed.

If you are shocked that you could have another panic attack, you'll just finish up cutting yourself off from everything in order to avoid having another. You might hide from the world, or alternatively separate yourself from the acquaintances and family who might instead be well placed to help you. If this sounds familiar to you, then you need to consider looking for professional help to empower you to dispel the threat of panic attacks that hangs over your head.

You may be able to aid yourself by evading the scenarios that make you have your panic attacks in the first place. One of the most important causes of panic attacks is stress, and if you're continually in intense situation, then you will be at a much greater risk for panic attacks in the future. This stress isn't necessarily the stress that comes over 1 or 2 days over a specific event; panic attacks are triggered by sustained stress over a span of months or infrequently even longer. This stress is often too much for folk to bear, and whether or not we don't understand that, our bodies do, and they rebel.

Panic episodes may also be due to certain scenarios. If you get a panic attack each time you are running late, or stuck in traffic, or going over a bridge, then you need to make certain to avoid those scenarios to stop these same events from causing more panic attacks in the future. You can take a different path to work, leave early, and avoid roads that you know will be snarled with traffic or even head to a local place for dinner after work before facing the drive home.

If you try avoiding panic attacks and document where you were, what you were doing, and how you felt immediately prior to each panic attack, then you can use this information to bypass the things that trigger you. You may be ready to save a lot of difficulty with your psychological and even your physical health later down the line.

Panic attacks do not just feel remarkably like heart attacks; latest studies have linked experiencing panic attacks with an increased possibility of basically having a cardiac arrest later on. Keep your percentages low and keep your levels of stress down to stop panic attacks and to stay as fit as practicable. No one likes to suffer, and panic attacks actually fall into the category of suffering.

If you're at risk for panic attacks or you've had them in the past, then you should examine the past factors behind your panic attacks so that you can help yourself to avoid similar circumstances in the future. You should also get in contact with your doctor to find out if you might need medicine or care to help you take control of your life and get away from the panic episodes. You can take a look at this panic away review for an alternative solution. It can be difficult to decide precisely the best way of stopping panic attacks, but you may improve results when pairing the practice of avoiding triggers with medicine to help feel calmer. A specialist can also help you learn mental tricks to help you ride thru the panic episodes without totally losing your cool next time you feel one coming on.

For more information on how to overcome amxiety and panic attacks please read my Linden Method review and Easy Calm review.

    Filed Under: Anxiety / Stress Tagged with , , , ,
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Sep

28

Humane Housing for the Mentally Ill

Posted By: wbhazel1 on September 28, 2011 at 12:13 pm

This brief article covers a good and decent act by Governor Andrew Cuomo. What was done in the past in terms of warehousing individuals with mental illness was a shame. These individuals who committed no crimes for all intents and purposes often were involuntarily committed. Think about the quality of life robbed from these patients. The next article provides a bit of background to this case

Humane Housing for the Mentally Ill

Settlement Changes New York Housing Policy for the Mentally Ill

    Filed Under: Abuse , Addiction Therapy , Anger , Anger Management , Anxiety / Stress , Anxiety Therapy , Bipolar Therapy , Depression , Depression Therapy , Difficult Emotions , Family Treatment , Group Treatment , Identity Issues , Individual Treatment , Low Self Esteem , Mood Fluctuation , Panic Attack Therapy , Parenting , Professional Counselor , Psychiatry , Psychology , PTSD / Trauma , Reality , Relationship Problems , Social Phobia Treatment , Social Work , Treatment modality , Trust Issues , Unresolved Childhood Issues , Violence
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Sep

26

Therapists Are ‘Seeing’ Patients Online:

Posted By: wbhazel1 on September 26, 2011 at 10:53 am

This is a great article highlighting the positive features of the modality (way I provide services) using electronic communication vs traditional brick and mortar facilities. In this method clients no longer need to sit in a waiting room anxiously decompressing after frightening or maddening traffic, parking woes all in an effort to otherwise balance their lives while seeking professional relief It speaks to accommodating individuals with childcare, transportation or phobias which prevent them from face to face encounters..

Prior to engagement with online therapists the chief advice is buyer beware. As a consumer of mental health services either in person or onlline ensure you are CLEAR in terms of with whom you are dealing. The internet is full of “therapists” without credentials, ethics, morals or the slightest idea of how you can receive help. To that end please please please trust BUT verify. Is your counselor licensed or certified and by what organization? Are they experienced in your personal issue? These are things that you the consumer can easily verify?

When this system works it really works for time, energy, reduction of stress and money can all be saved with appropriate online resources. Give them a try TODAY!

Therapists Are ‘Seeing’ Patients Online

    Filed Under: Abuse , Addiction Therapy , Agoraphobia Therapy , Anger Management , Anxiety / Stress , Anxiety Therapy , Bereavement-Grief , Bipolar Therapy , BPD Therapy , CBT , Depression , Depression Therapy , Difficult Emotions , Family Treatment , Group Treatment , Identity Issues , Individual Treatment , Insomnia Therapy , Low Self Esteem , Marriage & Relationship , Marriage and Family Therapist , Mood Fluctuation , OCD Therapy , Panic Attack Therapy , Parenting , Pre-Marital Counseling , Professional Counselor , Psychiatry , Psychology , PTSD / Trauma , Reality , REBT , Relationship Problems , Social Phobia Treatment , Social Work , Speech Anxiety , Treatment modality , Trust Issues , Unresolved Childhood Issues , Violence , Work Related Issues
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Sep

25

Ways to Prevent Schizophrenia

Posted By: Judith Moss on September 25, 2011 at 8:14 am

Prevention is the best medicine. However, how can you prevent something when you are not sure how or why it happens? Schizophrenia is an especially debilitating disease that affects one percent of the world’s population. Although this is a small number, the disease is very serious and has no cure. There are treatments for schizophrenia, but it is hard to control. Being able to prevent the disease would be ideal, but is that actually possible?

There are many things known about schizophrenia and how it manifests in most people. The symptoms of the disease often first appear during a person’s late teens or early twenties. Usually the first onset of the disease is tied to separation, leaving your parents home and starting your own life. This can be especially traumatic for some people. People who suffer from schizophrenia often hear voices; have hallucinations, and delusional beliefs. A person with schizophrenia might believe there are subliminal messages in a TV show that are just for them to hear or see. Needless to say, someone who suffers from this disease often suffers an intense social isolation.

The chance of someone developing schizophrenia if there is no history in the family is only one percent. However, if you do have someone in your family that has schizophrenia, your chances increase. The closer you are directly related, such as parent or sibling, the higher the probability. If you have a sibling with schizophrenia, your chance increases to five percent, and with a parent, the chance doubles to ten percent. The highest correlation is with identical twins. If your identical twin suffers from schizophrenia, you have a fifty/fifty chance of having the disease.

It is well established that a person’s genes play a large part in whether or not that person will develop schizophrenia. However, most people who develop the disease have no known relatives with it. If we think about the identical twin with a fifty-fifty chance of getting the disease, it is easy to see that environmental factors also play a large role in determining who gets the disease. If a person has some of the genes associated with schizophrenia, it is believed only if that person is exposed to certain environment and stresses, that the genes become active and possibly trigger schizophrenia. Although no one yet knows any real, concrete ways to prevent the onset of schizophrenia, there are lots of things to lowers your chances of schizophrenia. Depending on the age of the patient, there are numerous things that could be done to prevent schizophrenia.

Any woman of child bearing age should always be conscious of the possibility of getting pregnant. With this in mind, try and plan your pregnancy. Wanting the child and being ready for him or her will make the pregnancy much easier. Also, try to begin taking prenatal vitamins a few months before becoming pregnant and be sure to have prenatal visits with your doctor. Another good tip is to avoid all alcohol and lead exposure. Finally, do your best to avoid stress and depression. Everyone suffers from these two eventually, but it is how you handle them that determines their affect on your body and the body of your unborn child.

If you already have a child, there are other actions you can take to help minimize their chance of developing schizophrenia. During the first year of life, be sure to hold your baby as often as you can. It is important for the baby to experience at least four hours of human touch a day. Also, as with adults, try to limit your child’s exposure to stress. Try to teach your child a positive outlook on life. Finally, although this is sometimes impossible to do, minimize the risk of traumatic events in a child’s life. Childhood trauma is believed to be a precursor to mental illness.

One of the toughest times of life, adolescence, is also when symptoms of schizophrenia first start to emerge. However, there are suggestions to help protect your teenager. The first is to avoid all recreational drugs. These drugs make changes in the brain that could be a trigger for the disease. However, the most important idea is to avoid social isolation. Be sure to help equip your teenager with good social skills and a strong set of friends. If you notice that they are struggling in their teenage years, be sure to get them the help they need by contacting a psychiatrist or psychologist.

Complete prevention of schizophrenia is something that may be possible in the future. For now, doctors and scientists are trying to come up with the reasons why and how people develop the disease. There are steps you can take to lower your chance of getting schizophrenia. Further research will unlock the secrets of this disease and hopefully show us a way to get rid of it, or better yet, prevent it from happening at all.

Affinity is one of the finest depression treatment center which provides a full range of therapeutic care services to its clients. They also have dual diagnosis treatment centers california.

    Filed Under: Depression Tagged with
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Sep

24

More Excuses and Delays From the V.A.

Posted By: wbhazel1 on September 24, 2011 at 5:10 am

This article is surely not reflective of the Department of Veterans Affairs’ finest hour. They appear to continue to attempt to fight, blur, and otherwise obfuscate the apparent truth: that they are not providing quality care to America’s heroes. Quite simply they need to get with the program and improve the quality of care, particularly around mental health screening, diagnosis and care.

This can be accomplished by bringing in quality civilian mental health providers, attracting them with more reasonable pay and increased presence on behavioral health management teams. Lets face it, the people making the decisions have not made the greatest calls now it is time to make significant administrative changes.

More Excuses and Delays From the V.A.

    Filed Under: Abuse , Addiction Therapy , Anger , Anger Management , Anxiety / Stress , Anxiety Therapy , Bereavement-Grief , Bipolar Therapy , BPD Therapy , CBT , Depression , Depression Therapy , Difficult Emotions , Family Treatment , Group Treatment , Identity Issues , Individual Treatment , Insomnia Therapy , Low Self Esteem , Marriage & Relationship , Marriage and Family Therapist , Mood Fluctuation , OCD Therapy , Panic Attack Therapy , Parenting , Pre-Marital Counseling , Professional Counselor , Psychiatry , Psychology , PTSD / Trauma , Reality , Relationship Problems , Social Phobia Treatment , Social Work , Speech Anxiety , Treatment modality , Trust Issues , Unresolved Childhood Issues , Violence , Work Related Issues
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Sep

23

Teenager’s Path and a Killing Put Spotlight on Mental Care

Posted By: wbhazel1 on September 23, 2011 at 1:58 pm

This article had me virtually riveted throughout the reading. I felt shock, horror, sadness and found myself wishing that things could have been done in a very different manner. This story appears to be a textbook case of how decreased state resources, florid and untreated mental health issues coupled with cultural and cognitive dissonance, anger, no rage and the lack of an ideal seamless delivery of care that we would hope to provide our youth. Not being intimately aware of the details I see a young man who from early childhood displayed extremely harmful and violent behavior. There is no doubt he clearly required consistent professional intervention.

Reading about the custody of this young man being transferred to the state as his father, an immigrant did not have the resources to provide for his son the specialized care he needed I felt this story would not end well. According to this article and my professional experience he then was propelled through a series of institutional placements which appear to periodically disrupt due to violence against staff, peers often requiring his incarceration or hospitalization. I found it shocking and sad that the staff that cared for this young man within these facilities were unaware of the propensity for and history of violence.

The few resources which actually appeared helpful appear to have been shuttered due to budgetary cuts. When will we as a society learn we will pay the costs one way or another? This is to say either we pay for behavioral healthcare or costs associated with arrests, investigation, prosecution and incarceration. This story is all too predictable and all too common.

We need to do something differently.

Let’s care for our children.

Teenager’s Path and a Killing Put Spotlight on Mental Care

    Filed Under: Abuse , Anger , Anger Management , Anxiety / Stress , Anxiety Therapy , Bereavement-Grief , Bipolar Therapy , Depression , Depression Therapy , Difficult Emotions , Family Treatment , Group Treatment , Identity Issues , Individual Treatment , Low Self Esteem , Mood Fluctuation , Panic Attack Therapy , Parenting , Professional Counselor , Psychiatry , Psychology , PTSD / Trauma , Relationship Problems , Social Work , Treatment modality , Trust Issues , Unresolved Childhood Issues , Violence
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Sep

21

Depression and African-American

Posted By: wbhazel1 on September 21, 2011 at 12:37 pm

Depression is one of the most misunderstood, maligned and unreported/over reported diagnoses in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual Fourth Edition Text Revised (DSM IV-TR). Many have misconceptions of what it is, what it looks like and how it is treated. I have respectfully enclosed the criteria upon which this is diagnosed and attached several very relevant articles from authorities in the field about the need for increased awareness, and action to improve universally community quality of life. The DSM IV-TR describes this diagnosis as follows:

Major Depressive Episode

A. Five (or more) of the following symptoms have been present during the same 2-week period and represent a change from previous functioning; at least one of the symptoms is either (1) depressed mood or (2) loss of interest or pleasure.

Note: Do not include symptoms that are clearly due to a general medical condition, or mood-incongruent delusions or hallucinations.

(1) depressed mood most of the day, nearly every day, as indicated by either subjective report (e.g., feels sad or empty) or observation made by others (e.g., appears tearful). Note: In children and adolescents, can be irritable mood.

(2) markedly diminished interest or pleasure in all, or almost all, activities most of the day, nearly every day (as indicated by either subjective account or observation made by others)

(3) significant weight loss when not dieting or weight gain (e.g., a change of more than 5% of body weight in a month), or decrease or increase in appetite nearly every day. Note: In children, consider failure to make expected weight gains.

(4) insomnia or hypersomnia nearly every day

(5) psychomotor agitation or retardation nearly every day (observable by others, not merely subjective feelings of restlessness or being slowed down)

(6) fatigue or loss of energy nearly every day

(7) feelings of worthlessness or excessive or inappropriate guilt (which may be delusional) nearly every day (not merely self-reproach or guilt about being sick)

(8) diminished ability to think or concentrate, or indecisiveness, nearly every day (either by subjective account or as observed by others)

(9) recurrent thoughts of death (not just fear of dying), recurrent suicidal ideation without a specific plan, or a suicide attempt or a specific plan for committing suicide
B. The symptoms do not meet criteria for a Mixed Episode.

C. The symptoms cause clinically significant distress or impairment in social, occupational, or other important areas of functioning.

D. The symptoms are not due to the direct physiological effects of a substance (e.g., a drug of abuse, a medication) or a general medical condition (e.g., hypothyroidism).

E. The symptoms are not better accounted for by Bereavement, i.e., after the loss of a loved one, the symptoms persist for longer than 2 months or are characterized by marked functional impairment, morbid preoccupation with worthlessness, suicidal ideation, psychotic symptoms, or psychomotor retardation.
Major Depressive Disorder

Single Episode

A. Presence of a single Major Depressive Episode

B. The Major Depressive Episode is not better accounted for by Schizoaffective Disorder and is not superimposed on Schizophrenia, Schizophreniform Disorder, Delusional Disorder, or Psychotic Disorder Not Otherwise Specified.

C. There has never been a Manic Episode, a Mixed Episode, or a Hypomanic Episode. Note: This exclusion does not apply if all the manic-like, mixed-like, or hypomanic-like episodes are substance or treatment induced or are due to the direct physiological effects of a general medical condition.

Recurrent

A. Presence of two or more Major Depressive Episodes.

Note: To be considered separate episodes, there must be an interval of at least 2 consecutive months in which criteria are not met for a Major Depressive Episode.
B. The Major Depressive Episodes are not better accounted for by Schizoaffective Disorder and are not superimposed on Schizophrenia, Schizophreniform Disorder, Delusional Disorder, or Psychotic Disorder Not Otherwise Specified.

C. There has never been a Manic Episode, a Mixed Episode, or a Hypomanic Episode. Note: This exclusion does not apply if all the manic-like, mixed-like, or hypomanic-like episodes are substance or treatment induced or are due to the direct physiological effects or a general medical condition.
Specify (for current or most recent episode):

Severity/Psychotic/Remission Specifiers
Chronic
With Catatonic Features
With Atypical Features
With Postpartum Onset

Specify

Longitudinal Course Specifiers (With and Without Interepisode Recovery)
With Seasonal Pattern

This is the working definition for nearly all helping professionals responsible for diagnosis, treatment and other care of clients, consumers or patients. It is extremely workable and provides a common language, in fact a snapshot of what we therapist will probably observe when we assess the patient. Is it all inclusive however? Well any time we work clinically (with people) nothing is ever absolute is it? People will surprise you as they often do not display all of the exact characteristics that scientist (or treatment professionals) will come to expect.

Depression in African-Americans

African-Americans often do not display the same criteria in terms of cognitive or mood symptoms instead displaying more neurovegatative and somatic complaints. This is to say they don’t complain of sadness as much as physical aches, pains and maladies. Often depressive symptoms are displayed as anger, irritability and aggression. Treatment historically until current time has been noticeably different and unequal in terms of medications prescribed, therapy vs community supports i.e. church, extended family, friends etc.

http://www.pbs.org/thisemotionallife/blogs/black-and-depressed-two-african-american-women-break-silence

http://www.nytimes.com/2001/08/27/us/disparities-seen-in-mental-care-for-minorities.html?pagewanted=print&src=pm

http://thefreshxpress.com/2010/05/trouble-man-black-men-depression-and-suicide/

Ialongo Koenig Suicide

    Filed Under: Abuse , Anger , Anger Management , Anxiety / Stress , Anxiety Therapy , Bereavement-Grief , Depression , Depression Therapy , Difficult Emotions , Family Treatment , Group Treatment , Identity Issues , Individual Treatment , Insomnia Therapy , Low Self Esteem , Marriage & Relationship , Marriage and Family Therapist , Mood Fluctuation , Panic Attack Therapy , Parenting , Pre-Marital Counseling , Psychiatry , Psychology , PTSD / Trauma , Relationship Problems , Social Phobia Treatment , Social Work , Trust Issues , Unresolved Childhood Issues , Violence , Work Related Issues
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Sep

19

More veterans are using PTSD as defense in criminal cases – Los Angeles Times

Posted By: wbhazel1 on September 19, 2011 at 11:20 am

Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)  is a diagnosis frequently attached to people who have undergone a trauma in their life which deeply affected them and has lingering after effects which significantly hamper one or more of their major life areas. When I say major life areas I refer to eating, sleeping, walking, breathing, socialization, cohabitation, working or study. It affects relationships and general peace of mind.

The types of trauma which often induce PTSD in individuals can generally be described in one of two ways: Type 1 or Type 2 trauma. These can be explained as per the following terms developed by Lenore Terr to describe different types of trauma. A single traumatic event such as a fire or single rape episode is considered to be Type I Trauma. Repeated, prolonged trauma, such as extensive child abuse, is considered to be Type II Trauma. According to Terr’s clarification of this concept, these two types of trauma result in different coping styles.

Individuals with Type I Trauma receive support from family and friends and usually remember the trauma event. Individuals with Type II Trauma are more likely to have severe PTSD symptoms, such as psychic numbing, and dissociation. Type II Trauma is often kept a secret and support from family and friends may be absent.

The following LA Times article is one in which the perpetrator of a heinous crimes (sexual abuse and infanticide) and his legal team attempt to utilize PTSD as an affirmative defense or in other words he states “I did it but here is the reason why.” An affirmative defense is known, alternatively, as a justification, or an excuse, defense. Consequently, affirmative defenses limit or excuse a defendant’s criminal culpability or civil liability.

In this case, this defendant attempts to utilize California’s Insanity plea by virtue of having PTSD. In California the standard applied is called the Mc’Naghten rule . Under the Mc’Naghten rule, as applied to California law a defendant is adjudicated as legally insane if he is incapable of distinguishing between right and wrong or doesn’t understand the nature of his acts. In cases of insanity, a defendant is determined not guilty of the crime and is committed to a state mental hospital rather than prison.

Please read the LA Times article and lets continue our discussion as comments on this site are extremely welcome.

http://articles.latimes.com/2011/sep/14/nation/la-na-ptsd-20110915

    Filed Under: Abuse , Anger , Anger Management , Anxiety / Stress , Anxiety Therapy , Depression , Depression Therapy , Difficult Emotions , Family Treatment , Group Treatment , Identity Issues , Individual Treatment , Low Self Esteem , Marriage & Relationship , Marriage and Family Therapist , Mood Fluctuation , Panic Attack Therapy , Parenting , Pre-Marital Counseling , Professional Counselor , Psychiatry , Psychology , PTSD / Trauma , Reality , Relationship Problems , Social Phobia Treatment , Social Work , Trust Issues , Unresolved Childhood Issues , Violence , Work Related Issues
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