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Dec

11

In Wesleyan Student’s Killing, Not Guilty by Reason of Insanity

Posted By: wbhazel1 on December 11, 2011 at 7:19 am

This article shared by The Associated Press and published in The New York Times speaks to an interesting story of a Massachusettes man who stalked and killed a Connectuct Coed and the resulting trial which led to a Not Guilty by reason of Insanity. This case was just upheld on an applellate division court and it looks like the accused will now be committed to an institution for the criminally insane. The key point in the trial and subsequent appeals were that the accused could NOT conform his actions to the rules of law.For all of the fans of forensic behavioral health you can pretty much rely on these decisions as the guidelines and basis to be followed in subsequent legal actions. Please enjoy the article.

William B. Hazel, III,
ACSW, LCSW, LADC

In Wesleyan Student’s Killing, Not Guilty by Reason of Insanity

    Filed Under: Anger , Anger Management , Difficult Emotions , Professional Counselor , Psychiatry , Psychology , PTSD / Trauma , Social Work , Violence Tagged with , , , , , , , , , ,
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Nov

29

In Orthodox Jewish Enclaves, an Alarm Sounds Over Eating Disorders

Posted By: wbhazel1 on November 29, 2011 at 10:43 am

One of the things I truly love about my profession is there is always so much to learn about people and they very often are willing guides to the rich tapesty that is their lives. This article written by Roni Caryn Rabin for The New York Times was a delightful read as I learned something of which I was previously unaware. This article published in The Health Section reviews eating disorders within Orthodox Jewish Communities.

Please enjoy this delightful article that shares how their culture in some ways may encourage certain behaviors which can frequently mask these illnesses. Another huge point is the stigma of mental illness within this community can very often serve as a barrier to identication and care. Of course one would be negligent to fail to mention how community leaders can impact families coming forward to receive services. Finally where do these patients receive their care? All of these are very important assessment and treatment considerations in order to maximize optimal outcomes for all relevant shareholders.

William B. Hazel, III,
ACSW, LCSW, LADC

In Orthodox Jewish Enclaves, an Alarm Sounds Over Eating Disorders

    Filed Under: Addiction Therapy , Depression , Depression Therapy , Individual Treatment , Professional Counselor , Psychiatry , Psychology , Social Work , Treatment modality , Unresolved Childhood Issues Tagged with , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
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Nov

27

Learning to Listen to Distressed Classmates

Posted By: wbhazel1 on November 27, 2011 at 10:38 am

This is article written by Abigail Sullivan Moore for the New York Times is a welcome read as it provides us helping professionals with an ounce of prevention if you will. It discusses a student support center and additional resources for college students who may find that life’s challenges have become a bit unmanageable. There is no need to review recent campus tragedies to know that oft times young people today are under an immense amount of stress and pressure with multiple competing demands and all too often little external support. It is good to know that such resources exist and I’m glad many campuses fully recognize this need.

It is no secret that young people often go to their peers for advice, help or just to be a listening board of sorts. It is refreshing that these peers learn to recognize warning signs of despair AND know how to make it sound ok to seek help from a qualified professional. Please enjoy the article:

William B. Hazel, III,
ACSW, LCSW, LADC

Learning to Listen to Distressed Classmates

    Filed Under: Difficult Emotions , Identity Issues , Individual Treatment , Parenting , Professional Counselor , Psychiatry , Psychology , Social Phobia Treatment , Social Work , Trust Issues , Unresolved Childhood Issues Tagged with , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
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Nov

26

Talk Doesn’t Pay, So Psychiatry Turns to Drug Therapy

Posted By: wbhazel1 on November 26, 2011 at 10:36 am

This article written by Gardiner Harris of The New York Times reiterates what we helping professionals already know. We have been aware for some years now that psychotherapy is now the province of primarily psychologists and social workers. Not meaning to get into a fight with other helping professionals here but social workers are the largest providers of mental health services (talk therapy) in The United States. Now having said that this article was indeed sad to read. It spoke of a psychiatrist who no longer finds it financially feasible to practice his craft, psychotherapy. Dr. Donald Levin reports that his practice is now relegated to approximately 12-15 minutes per patient daily where he primarily serves in a medication management role.

I posted this article for several reasons : To formally acknowlege what has oft been discussed in the circles of helping professionals that psychiatrists although invaluable in every arena of skilled provision for mental health care are no longer at the forefront of counseling and therapeutic service delivery. Other professionals must now be prepared (as if we have not for years) accept the gauntlet of stepping forward and serving as full partners in the assessment, diagnosing and treatment of mental health disorders. The article makes significant points that lacking a medical school education should allow us to provide less expensive fees to provide services for more people. We must recognize this and after a medical assessment do what we do best. The article speaks to the idea that there is no discernible difference in quality between the two professions (psychiatry and clinical social work or psychology). As the least expensive practitioners it should enable us to move forward in our areas of expertise , learn more serve more. Please enjoy this article.

William B. Hazel, III,
ACSW, LCSW, LADC

Talk Doesn’t Pay, So Psychiatry Turns to Drug Therapy

    Filed Under: Individual Treatment , Professional Counselor , Psychiatry , Psychology , Social Work , Work Related Issues Tagged with , , , , , , , ,
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Nov

24

With Anorexia, Total Recovery Can Be Elusive

Posted By: wbhazel1 on November 24, 2011 at 11:43 am

This is very good qualitative article written by Abby Ellin for The New York Times.

It discussed the eating disorder Anorexia, an illness inwhich at least a third of sufferers will chronically suffer and another third will die of this disease.

Interestingly enough despite the widespread impact that this disorder has, particularly on women and adolescents there is a dearth of studies relating to recovery.

Recovery has been defined in different ways by different groups. According to this article there is shockingly very few studies done on recovery

I think a helpful way of looking at Anorexia and Bullimia is it is a disorder with significant medical as well as mental health components which each must receive proper therapy.

It was interesting to read about the emergency room physician at a high powered medical school who after years of recovery relapsed and saw her life suffer a significant setback.

All in all this was an interesting read and worth sharing.

Please enjoy this article:

William B. Hazel III,
ACSW, LCSW, LADC

With Anorexia, Total Recovery Can Be Elusive

    Filed Under: Addiction Therapy , Depression , Depression Therapy , Difficult Emotions , Identity Issues , Individual Treatment , Low Self Esteem , Professional Counselor , Psychiatry , Psychology , Relationship Problems , Social Phobia Treatment , Social Work Tagged with , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
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Oct

30

Fort Hood’s new treatment program helps Soldiers with behavioral health, addiction issues

Posted By: wbhazel1 on October 30, 2011 at 8:48 am

This article written by Patricia Deal of The Carl R Darnall Army Medical Center Public Affairs Office has indeed provided us in the treatment community with a special treat! This is exciting news for the recovery community in uniform that is. FT Hood, the Army’s largest installation, has recently opened the very first Intensive Outpatient program within the Continental United States. There servicemembers will be treated for substance abuse and mental health issues simultaneously. Sure, we’ve known for quite awhile that this is the only treatment which is effective and provides the very best outcomes. The armed services, however, have had this level of care in overseas installations but this is indeed a breakthrough in the states and I wish them God Speed and the very best for all of our warriors to get the assistance they truly need and deserve.

This is quite notable also for FT Hood which houses a full tenth of active duty soldiers in the world. I realize that the behavioral health professionals at that installation are fully booked & overworked, as are local providers. We can only speculate on the politics involved in creating such a facility and the thoughts that some of those resources might be better allocated elsewhere. I am glad that this facility was allowed to be opened to provide a level of care enviable in their community. I have no doubt that this facility will have no shortage of patients ready-willing-and eager to avail of this modality of care. It is also refreshing to hear that the patients’ level of motivation will also be assessed to ensure that those entering care in this facility have the very best outcomes.

I felt it interesting to read one the account of the soldier/patient who attended the ribbon cutting ceremony and spoke about receiving compassionate, nonjudgmental care that did not seek to assess blame but instead spoke of understanding and encouragement to do the work necessary to ameliorate his condition. I think that speaks volumes because sometimes in military communities that is forgotten. The servicemember KNOWS he or she is still in the military but for a few hours or weeks some of that needs to be put aside and allow them to be patients. Shame, guilt and humiliation (therapeutic community or old school) tactics have no place in our treatment facilities. It should be stamped wherever it may still linger.

Finally, it was refreshing to see the interdiciplinary team of a psychiatrist, clinical consultant, psychologist, director, social workers and counselors (certified addiction professionals, no doubt) all working together to provide the very best in clinical care.

Well, enough of my ramblings please enjoy the article BRAVO!!!!!!

William B. Hazel, III, ACSW, LCSW, LADC

Article:
Fort Hood’s new treatment program helps Soldiers with behavioral health, addiction issues

Fort Hood Program Seeks Better Care for Vets

Read the Transcript: to.pbs.org A new military program in Fort Hood, Texas warrants top of the line treatment for wounded soldiers coming home from Afghanistan and Iraq. Ray Suarez reports.

    Filed Under: Abuse , Addiction Therapy , Anger , Anger Management , Anxiety / Stress , Anxiety Therapy , Bipolar Therapy , BPD Therapy , CBT , Depression , Depression Therapy , Difficult Emotions , Family Treatment , Group Treatment , Identity Issues , Individual Treatment , Low Self Esteem , Marriage & Relationship , Marriage and Family Therapist , Mood Fluctuation , OCD Therapy , Panic Attack Therapy , Parenting , Pre-Marital Counseling , Professional Counselor , Psychiatry , Psychology , PTSD / Trauma , Reality , REBT , Relationship Problems , Social Phobia Treatment , Social Work , Treatment modality , Trust Issues , Unresolved Childhood Issues , Violence , Work Related Issues Tagged with , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
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Oct

27

Revising Book on Disorders of the Mind

Posted By: wbhazel1 on October 27, 2011 at 11:27 am

As part of my review of some of the earthshaking changes in the world of the helping professions I bring you the news straight from the sources. The newest incarnation of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual Fourth Edition Text Revised (DSM IV-TR) or otherwise fondly referred to as “The Clinician’s Bible”.

As you will see there is significant reorganization, reworking and redefining going on. This is critical because it will significantly change how treatment providers look at mental health and the people who live with diagnostic conditions everyday.

Revising Book on Disorders of the Mind

Dr. Beth Erickson: What Is Posttraumatic Stress Disorder?

The DSM is the clinician's Bible for diagnosing mental illnesses. A. The person has been exposed to a traumatic event in which both of the following were present: (1)The person experienced, witnessed, or was confronted

Publish Date: 03/29/2011 1:26

http://drbetherickson.blogspot.com/2011/03/what-is-posttraumatic-stress-disorder.html

The Clinician's Bible

Good news. After much research (flipping through the DSM-IV) and googling on the internet, and with a little help from my friend, I finally figured out what's wrong with my client. Now, I'm more confident of my assessment report :) On

Publish Date: 02/13/2005 15:21

http://noriyell.blogspot.com/2005/02/clinicians-bible.html

    Filed Under: Abuse , Addiction Therapy , Agoraphobia Therapy , Anger , Anger Management , Anxiety / Stress , Anxiety Therapy , Bereavement-Grief , Bipolar Therapy , BPD Therapy , CBT , Depression , Depression Therapy , Difficult Emotions , Family Treatment , Group Treatment , Identity Issues , Individual Treatment , Insomnia Therapy , Low Self Esteem , Marriage & Relationship , Marriage and Family Therapist , Mood Fluctuation , OCD Therapy , Panic Attack Therapy , Parenting , Pre-Marital Counseling , Professional Counselor , Psychiatry , Psychology , PTSD / Trauma , Reality , REBT , Relationship Problems , Social Phobia Treatment , Social Work , Treatment modality , Trust Issues , Unresolved Childhood Issues , Violence , Work Related Issues Tagged with , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
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Oct

18

Ohio: Lawyers Seek to Spare Life of Killer of 11 Women

Posted By: wbhazel1 on October 18, 2011 at 10:18 am

This article from a few months ago published in The New York Times briefly mentions PTSD as used as a defense in a criminal trial.

Apparently the defendant suffers from other possibly diagnosable conditions as I can’t see PTSD being the cause for his homicidal behavior in this particular case.

Please enjoy the article:

Ohio: Lawyers Seek to Spare Life of Killer of 11 Women

    Filed Under: Anger , Anger Management , Difficult Emotions , Individual Treatment , Mood Fluctuation , Panic Attack Therapy , Professional Counselor , Psychiatry , Psychology , PTSD / Trauma , Relationship Problems , Social Work , Trust Issues , Unresolved Childhood Issues , Violence Tagged with , , , , , , , ,
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Oct

14

Eating Disorders a New Front in Insurance Fight

Posted By: wbhazel1 on October 14, 2011 at 11:06 am

This article printed in The New York Times covers a relatively long term debate over what managed care companies should and should not cover in terms of mental health diagnoses.

Despite the relatively recent federal and many state mental health parity laws it appears that many insurers still have not yet gotten the message. In this article they argue the merits of residential treatment programs which they apparently view with a rather jaundiced eye. Is this a case of being penny wise and pound foolish whereas they will readily pay for hospital level care which we all know is infinitely more expensive or the comparable skilled nursing facility.

They additionally are willing to pay for outpatient level care which as we helping professionals realize is insufficient to meet the needs of many. I won’t get into the great debate of federal oversight over residential care facilities but I will readily state that it helps many thousands of patients on a consistent basis. The diagnoses this article portrays? Eating Disorders which affects all segments but especially young women, particularly those of adolescent age. Please enjoy the article.

Eating Disorders a New Front in Insurance Fight

Eating Disorders-Health Insurance Problems

Hello everyone: I need you to tell me your personal story regarding any and all health insurance problems you have had when seeking coverage for your eating disorder. Something needs to be done about this core issue that appears to be impacting the v…

How to get life insurance when you have an eating disorder

Regina Waldroup reports: If you have an eating disorder and apply for life insurance, it could mean trouble for obtaining insurance or knock you out of the running for insurance altogether. The impact an eating disorder has on the body can be devasta…

Causes 2009

Why do Insurance Companies not cover treatment for eating disorders?

    Filed Under: Abuse , Addiction Therapy , Anxiety / Stress , Anxiety Therapy , Depression , Depression Therapy , Difficult Emotions , Individual Treatment , Low Self Esteem , Mood Fluctuation , Professional Counselor , Psychiatry , Psychology , Unresolved Childhood Issues Tagged with , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
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Sep

01

Methods To Deal With The Effects Of Severe Anxiety.

Posted By: Charleston Davinci Xavier on September 1, 2011 at 8:29 am

There are numerous reasons that make finding the solution to coping with extreme stress difficult. The most important and influential consideration really has everything to do with the individual person. Each individual affected by severe trauma will have a different and unpredictable response to the event. While much is known about the reactions, how they will become manifest in a person is not known. Two extreme differences in reactions are immediate responses and symptoms and highly delayed responses and symptoms. Some people, when dealing with the same condition may show very few symptoms or adverse reactions. One could say it is a very diverse picture when dealing with extreme stress.

It is usually overwhelming for people and resources that have to deal with any kind of disaster, which often happen fast and unexpectedly. Just remember the undersea earthquake and tsunami that devastated northern Japan. There is a good example of how thousands of people were affected by disaster and extreme trauma. Since most people do not ever see the need to gain a deeper understanding of emotional injury and attendant reactions, because that knowledge is extremely helpful, most are not prepared to deal with it. In that case, it can make a big difference if some kind of professional assistance is sought. Being aware that something is wrong within them and doing something about it gives the affected person the upper hand.

Extreme stress for family members could be the result of a home environment that is highly stressful. Remembering that people always have a choice on their behavior is one way to help yourself if your parent is the cause of your stress. Using honest and open communication is one the positive approaches to handling this situation. A positive approach you might try is to sit down with your parents and talk to them about how their behavior makes you feel. If you feel safe doing so, you might even try to suggest some form of counseling.

That is the reason arranging professional guidance needs to be done right away. With the assistance of a trained psychologist, you can learn to help your child through the ordeal and the psychologist will help your child deal with the stress reactions.

If you are an adult who is experiencing unusually extreme stress, then be assured there are positive ways to cope with it. You do have the ability to retain some degree of control over your life. The first thing to understand it that you may be feeling certain emotions that seem unusually intense. You might find that because of the cause of stress that a typically normal situation could trigger an stress reaction. Accepting what has happened as well as learning what types of reactions you might have is important. It is important to be aware of what you are experiencing so that you can understand how it affects you. How to deal with extreme stress, anxiety or trauma can be tricky because of the many factors involved. The early stage where symptoms of reactions might or might not be present is the most important phase. It is very helpful of course, to have people who are caring and supportive and willing to help the person get through the ordeal. The individual will also need ongoing long term strategies to find the most effective approach to handle the situation.

One thing that can cause a great deal of stress is cash issues. One easy approach to relieve numerous money difficulties is to apply a debit card rather than a credit card. This way, you will simply spend the cash you have, and you won’t tumble further into debt. Talk with your financial institution for more information.

To learn exactly why the incredible Chase debit card is the best approach to make improvements to your fiscal life, pay a visit to the famous Chase debit card web site straight away.

    Filed Under: Anxiety / Stress Tagged with , , , , , , , , ,
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