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Dec

14

Getting Someone to Psychiatric Treatment Can Be Difficult and Inconclusive

Posted By: wbhazel1 on December 14, 2011 at 7:25 am

This was a fascinating article written by G. Sulzberger and Benedict Carey for The New York Times. It speaks to the often emotionally and physically exhausting task to get someone who you think would benefit with behavioral health assessment and/or intervention to acquiece to receiving this support. It speaks to the inherent rights of individuals to decide their own destiny, limited public resources dedicated to mental health services and the oft futility of after release the client must be trusted to comply with future appointments and/or medication management. In the helping professions particularly with addictions treatment we get a fair share (75%?) of involuntary clients. We get them pulled, pushed or wheeled in by parents, spouses, employers or the criminal justice system. Please enjoy this article as I believe it will give us helping professionals some added insight into who is walking through our doors.

William B. Hazel, III,
ACSW, LCSW, LADC

Getting Someone to Psychiatric Treatment Can Be Difficult and Inconclusive

    Filed Under: Individual Treatment , Professional Counselor , Psychiatry , Psychology , Social Work , Treatment modality , Trust Issues Tagged with , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
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Dec

08

Vital Signs: Behavior: Videos of Self-Injury Find an Audience

Posted By: wbhazel1 on December 8, 2011 at 11:04 am

This very interesting and thought provoking article written by Roni Caryn Rabin for The New York Times Health Section refers to an extremely popular form of social media viewed by millions daily: Youtube.

Apparently there are numerous videos on Youtube which portray self mutilation like burning, cutting, disturbing wounds and embedding items under the skin. Many lack warnings and some appear to glamorize this parasuicidal behavior with theme music of sorts. This is important information for helping professionals to know because any of us who treat children and adolescents should know of the nearly cultlike following many have for Youtube videos. This article and the surrounding awareness of social media can help us to ask the questions many of us would never even consider. Please enjoy this article and let the dialogue begin:

William B. Hazel, III,
ACSW, LCSW, LADC

Vital Signs: Behavior: Videos of Self-Injury Find an Audience

    Filed Under: Abuse , Anger , Anger Management , Difficult Emotions , Identity Issues , Individual Treatment , Low Self Esteem , Professional Counselor , Psychiatry , Psychology , PTSD / Trauma , Social Phobia Treatment , Social Work , Unresolved Childhood Issues , Violence Tagged with , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
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Dec

03

Treating People With Schizophrenia

Posted By: wbhazel1 on December 3, 2011 at 10:55 am

These letters published in The New York Times Opinion Page were written by psychiatrists on the cutting edge of treatment of individuals who live with Schizophrenia and other psychotic disorders.The letters were written in response to another posted article“Finding purpose after living with delusion” (“Lives Restored” series, front page, Nov. 26.

They discuss and lament changes in the field reflecting pressures they are under to treat symptoms through medication management without the use of psychotherapy. They are essentially prohibitted from providing talk therapy to any patient unless said patient has the financial resources to pay out of pocket. Please enjoy this article and comment.

William B. Hazel, III,
ACSW, LCSW, LADC

Treating People With Schizophrenia

    Filed Under: Professional Counselor , Psychiatry , Psychology , Social Work Tagged with , , , , , , , , , ,
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Dec

02

Lives Restored Finding Purpose after Living with Delusion

Posted By: wbhazel1 on December 2, 2011 at 10:52 am

This recent article was written by Benedict Carey of The New York Times which portray the story of yet another exceptionally successful man who for over 30 years has utilized his Schizophrenia in a different way. Far from viewing it as a debilitating illness and all negative he has embraced his delusions and found a unique way to channel them in a positive direction.

This article discusses a relatively novel concept which debunks (yet again) traditional thought. Many psychiatrists and other helping professionals believe that psychosis should be treated as opposed to viewed within the framework that they can be cured through the resolution of contributory issues. In short help the psychological hurts which create the psychosis in addition to trying to eradicate them solely through medication management. Please enjoy the article and comment.

William B. Hazel, III,
ACSW, LCSW, LADC

Lives Restored Finding Purpose after Living with Delusion

    Filed Under: Individual Treatment , Professional Counselor , Psychiatry , Psychology , Social Work Tagged with , , , , , , , , ,
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Dec

01

Analyzing Your Therapist: A Rorschach Test?

Posted By: wbhazel1 on December 1, 2011 at 10:49 am

These two letters to the editor published in The New York Times Opinion Pages were written by a psychiatrist and a clinical social worker respectively. They both have rather definitive views on The Opinion piece by Dr. Keeley Holmes a psychologist who wrote of her dismay at clients publishing online complaints, concerns or observations of their experiences in therapy in non healthcare related forums. Please enjoy the letters and it is my hope that their conflicting views may stimulate our own dialogue around our thoughts in this area.

William B. Hazel, III,
ACSW, LCSW, LADC

Analyzing Your Therapist: A Rorschach Test?

    Filed Under: Family Treatment , Group Treatment , Individual Treatment , Marriage and Family Therapist , Pre-Marital Counseling , Professional Counselor , Psychiatry , Psychology , Social Work , Trust Issues , Work Related Issues Tagged with , , , , , , , , , ,
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Nov

29

In Orthodox Jewish Enclaves, an Alarm Sounds Over Eating Disorders

Posted By: wbhazel1 on November 29, 2011 at 10:43 am

One of the things I truly love about my profession is there is always so much to learn about people and they very often are willing guides to the rich tapesty that is their lives. This article written by Roni Caryn Rabin for The New York Times was a delightful read as I learned something of which I was previously unaware. This article published in The Health Section reviews eating disorders within Orthodox Jewish Communities.

Please enjoy this delightful article that shares how their culture in some ways may encourage certain behaviors which can frequently mask these illnesses. Another huge point is the stigma of mental illness within this community can very often serve as a barrier to identication and care. Of course one would be negligent to fail to mention how community leaders can impact families coming forward to receive services. Finally where do these patients receive their care? All of these are very important assessment and treatment considerations in order to maximize optimal outcomes for all relevant shareholders.

William B. Hazel, III,
ACSW, LCSW, LADC

In Orthodox Jewish Enclaves, an Alarm Sounds Over Eating Disorders

    Filed Under: Addiction Therapy , Depression , Depression Therapy , Individual Treatment , Professional Counselor , Psychiatry , Psychology , Social Work , Treatment modality , Unresolved Childhood Issues Tagged with , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
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Nov

26

Talk Doesn’t Pay, So Psychiatry Turns to Drug Therapy

Posted By: wbhazel1 on November 26, 2011 at 10:36 am

This article written by Gardiner Harris of The New York Times reiterates what we helping professionals already know. We have been aware for some years now that psychotherapy is now the province of primarily psychologists and social workers. Not meaning to get into a fight with other helping professionals here but social workers are the largest providers of mental health services (talk therapy) in The United States. Now having said that this article was indeed sad to read. It spoke of a psychiatrist who no longer finds it financially feasible to practice his craft, psychotherapy. Dr. Donald Levin reports that his practice is now relegated to approximately 12-15 minutes per patient daily where he primarily serves in a medication management role.

I posted this article for several reasons : To formally acknowlege what has oft been discussed in the circles of helping professionals that psychiatrists although invaluable in every arena of skilled provision for mental health care are no longer at the forefront of counseling and therapeutic service delivery. Other professionals must now be prepared (as if we have not for years) accept the gauntlet of stepping forward and serving as full partners in the assessment, diagnosing and treatment of mental health disorders. The article makes significant points that lacking a medical school education should allow us to provide less expensive fees to provide services for more people. We must recognize this and after a medical assessment do what we do best. The article speaks to the idea that there is no discernible difference in quality between the two professions (psychiatry and clinical social work or psychology). As the least expensive practitioners it should enable us to move forward in our areas of expertise , learn more serve more. Please enjoy this article.

William B. Hazel, III,
ACSW, LCSW, LADC

Talk Doesn’t Pay, So Psychiatry Turns to Drug Therapy

    Filed Under: Individual Treatment , Professional Counselor , Psychiatry , Psychology , Social Work , Work Related Issues Tagged with , , , , , , , ,
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Nov

24

With Anorexia, Total Recovery Can Be Elusive

Posted By: wbhazel1 on November 24, 2011 at 11:43 am

This is very good qualitative article written by Abby Ellin for The New York Times.

It discussed the eating disorder Anorexia, an illness inwhich at least a third of sufferers will chronically suffer and another third will die of this disease.

Interestingly enough despite the widespread impact that this disorder has, particularly on women and adolescents there is a dearth of studies relating to recovery.

Recovery has been defined in different ways by different groups. According to this article there is shockingly very few studies done on recovery

I think a helpful way of looking at Anorexia and Bullimia is it is a disorder with significant medical as well as mental health components which each must receive proper therapy.

It was interesting to read about the emergency room physician at a high powered medical school who after years of recovery relapsed and saw her life suffer a significant setback.

All in all this was an interesting read and worth sharing.

Please enjoy this article:

William B. Hazel III,
ACSW, LCSW, LADC

With Anorexia, Total Recovery Can Be Elusive

    Filed Under: Addiction Therapy , Depression , Depression Therapy , Difficult Emotions , Identity Issues , Individual Treatment , Low Self Esteem , Professional Counselor , Psychiatry , Psychology , Relationship Problems , Social Phobia Treatment , Social Work Tagged with , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
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Nov

23

Treating the Traumas Inflicted on Children

Posted By: wbhazel1 on November 23, 2011 at 11:40 am

This Opinion piece was published in The New York Times and written by Bessel A. van der Kolk, a professor of psychiatry at Boston University School of Medicine, is the founder and medical director of the Trauma Center at the Justice Resource Institute.

It raises interesting questions in the mind of this former child protective services professional and should stimulate dialogue from all helping professionals.

Dr. Van Der Kolk speaks of the development and increased understanding of the effects of trauma as experienced in combat but additionally that served through the experience of an invalidating and nonnurturing childhood.

It was distressing to read that President Obama is proposing a reduction by 70% of funding for The National Child Traumatic Stress Network which was created in 2001.

This network was patterned after The National Center for PTDS and serves to study, evaluate and develop treatment for traumatized children nationwide.

I see the policymakers have not yet learned how the least powerful among us are treated is the way we will get it much later.

Please enjoy the reading of this piece and lets get the word out.

William B. Hazel III,
ACSW, LCSW, LADC

Treating the Traumas Inflicted on Children

    Filed Under: Abuse , Individual Treatment , Parenting , Professional Counselor , Psychiatry , Psychology , Social Work , Unresolved Childhood Issues Tagged with , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
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Nov

22

Need Therapy? A Good Man Is Hard to Find

Posted By: wbhazel1 on November 22, 2011 at 11:39 am

This article written by Benedict Carey of The New York Times was a simply fantastic and interesting read.

In fact this article struck me more personally than most as I find it has mirrored my own experience.

This article speaks to the dearth of male therapists no matter what their discipline.

It speaks to the fact that psychiatry, psychology,marriage and family therapy as well clinical social work, counseling and addictions treatment is more than dominated by women but nearly completely.

It speaks of the lack of male therapists, students and even candidates to clinical programs.

I won’t get into the why so much in this introduction as the article speaks to that but I will say that for most male patients a shared life experience or acculturation is preferred.

There are simply differences in language, body posture and nuances that are oft subject to misinterpretation.

I have posted another article on the great need for African-American therapists for which I also believe this to be true.

As one of the first things that any therapist seeks to establish is a therapeutic alliance to have a person who looks like you, understands you and can relate to your experience is a plus.

Please enjoy this article and kindly tell me your thoughts: Let’s begin the dialogue.

William B. Hazel III,
ACSW, LCSW, LADC

Need Therapy? A Good Man Is Hard to Find

    Filed Under: Individual Treatment , Professional Counselor , Psychiatry , Psychology , Social Work , Work Related Issues Tagged with , , , , , , , ,
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