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Dec

12

The Twice-Victimized of Sexual Assault

Posted By: wbhazel1 on December 12, 2011 at 7:21 am

This article written by Jane Brody for The New York Times Personal Health Section was a delightful and informative read although the subject matter was disillusioning. The article provides what appears to be very comprehensive statistics on the number, percentages and frequencies of offenses perpetrated on women. The author speaks frankly about being a survivor of abusive behavior in situations inwhich the perpetrators clearly took advantage of power differential in their favor and caused understandable silense as well as self doubt.

This article also speaks to the areas of sexual harassment and related offenses, the serial nature of these offenders and how the women are further victimized in the media, legal venues and society at large. It is clear that despite the fact that we as a society may not WANT to read articles like this it is clear that they MUST be revealed to bring about change. Kudos to the author of this great article for helping to evoke dialogue!

William B. Hazel, III,
ACSW, LCSW, LADC

The Twice-Victimized of Sexual Assault

    Filed Under: Abuse , Anger , Anger Management , Anxiety / Stress , Anxiety Therapy , Depression , Depression Therapy , Difficult Emotions , Individual Treatment , Low Self Esteem , Psychiatry , Psychology , PTSD / Trauma , Social Work , Violence Tagged with , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
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Dec

04

After Duty, Dogs Suffer Like Soldiers

Posted By: wbhazel1 on December 4, 2011 at 10:56 am

This article written by James Dao of The New York Times recently brought to my attention at least the behavioral health condition referred to by Veternarians as Canine PTSD. It is no secret that man’s best friend is socialized to accompany us everywhere. From the picnic to the battlefield there is evidence that humans and dogs share much. This article written in the backdrop of FT Sam Houston and referencing military mental health professionals who treat humans have observed rather fascinating traits in our friends. Please enjoy the article and lets discuss.

William B. Hazel, III,
ACSW, LCSW, LADC

After Duty, Dogs Suffer Like Soldiers

    Filed Under: Abuse , Anxiety / Stress , Anxiety Therapy , Depression , Difficult Emotions , Individual Treatment , Professional Counselor , Psychiatry , Psychology , PTSD / Trauma , Social Work , Violence , Work Related Issues Tagged with , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
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Nov

24

With Anorexia, Total Recovery Can Be Elusive

Posted By: wbhazel1 on November 24, 2011 at 11:43 am

This is very good qualitative article written by Abby Ellin for The New York Times.

It discussed the eating disorder Anorexia, an illness inwhich at least a third of sufferers will chronically suffer and another third will die of this disease.

Interestingly enough despite the widespread impact that this disorder has, particularly on women and adolescents there is a dearth of studies relating to recovery.

Recovery has been defined in different ways by different groups. According to this article there is shockingly very few studies done on recovery

I think a helpful way of looking at Anorexia and Bullimia is it is a disorder with significant medical as well as mental health components which each must receive proper therapy.

It was interesting to read about the emergency room physician at a high powered medical school who after years of recovery relapsed and saw her life suffer a significant setback.

All in all this was an interesting read and worth sharing.

Please enjoy this article:

William B. Hazel III,
ACSW, LCSW, LADC

With Anorexia, Total Recovery Can Be Elusive

    Filed Under: Addiction Therapy , Depression , Depression Therapy , Difficult Emotions , Identity Issues , Individual Treatment , Low Self Esteem , Professional Counselor , Psychiatry , Psychology , Relationship Problems , Social Phobia Treatment , Social Work Tagged with , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
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Nov

18

Army officer from Maryland killed in Afghanistan bomb attack

Posted By: wbhazel1 on November 18, 2011 at 11:31 am

This article written by Martin Weil and published in The Washington Post Local tells about the death of LTC David Cabrera, an army social work officer, a professor and therapist.

COL Cabrera did not have to go downrange in harms way as with his senior officer rank, university professor/researcher/clinical position not to mention that he already had served in combat already all would have had a junior officer take his role.

COL Cabrera however loved serving troops and volunteered to serve more time in the sandbox.

I know I’ve mentioned in a few articles about the great dearth of licensed clinical social workers throughout the federal system.

I attended a workshop in 2010 given during the Force Protection Conference in Phoenix.

The workshop was for active duty social work officers (of which I’m not) but was allowed to listen in.

The fact is relatively simple; Numbers are down and EVERY social work officer WILL deploy downrange and probably more than one.

They are needed not only in garrison mental health clinics but in a wartime mission of mental health stabilization units.

Social work officers unlike nearly all of their medical service colleagues CAN Command combat and combat service support units.

This unfortunately is the reality of going to war and not likely to be shared by your local recruiter. Please enjoy the article.

William B. Hazel III,
ACSW, LCSW, LADC

Army officer from Maryland killed in Afghanistan bomb attack

    Filed Under: Individual Treatment , Professional Counselor , Psychiatry , Psychology , PTSD / Trauma , Social Work , Violence , Work Related Issues Tagged with , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
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Oct

29

Social work and the U.S. military is focus of campus conference

Posted By: wbhazel1 on October 29, 2011 at 9:17 am

This is a review of a presentation by the Army’s top social worker and liasion to the Surgeon General.

It is clear that all branches of the military desperately need social workers (LCSW/lLICSW) in ALL roles such as active duty, reserve component, civilian and contrators.

Things have been so tough that the Air Force no longer can employ or deploy direct social work staff outside of The Continental United States.

Their social work function for active duty, civilians and dependents with needs is two fold.

1. Use contractors or send the person in need back home to the USA where they can get services.

2. Sending your loved one back home. Early Return of Dependent to CONUS.

A sad state of affairs but a boon to professionals deemed qualified.

William B. Hazel, III, ACSW, LCSW, LADC

Social work and the U.S. military is focus of campus conference

    Filed Under: Abuse , Addiction Therapy , Anger , Anger Management , Anxiety / Stress , Anxiety Therapy , Bereavement-Grief , Bipolar Therapy , BPD Therapy , CBT , Depression , Depression Therapy , Difficult Emotions , Family Treatment , Group Treatment , Identity Issues , Individual Treatment , Insomnia Therapy , Low Self Esteem , Mood Fluctuation , OCD Therapy , Panic Attack Therapy , Pre-Marital Counseling , Professional Counselor , Psychiatry , Psychology , PTSD / Trauma , Reality , REBT , Relationship Problems , Social Phobia Treatment , Treatment modality , Trust Issues , Unresolved Childhood Issues , Violence , Work Related Issues Tagged with , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
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Oct

27

Revising Book on Disorders of the Mind

Posted By: wbhazel1 on October 27, 2011 at 11:27 am

As part of my review of some of the earthshaking changes in the world of the helping professions I bring you the news straight from the sources. The newest incarnation of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual Fourth Edition Text Revised (DSM IV-TR) or otherwise fondly referred to as “The Clinician’s Bible”.

As you will see there is significant reorganization, reworking and redefining going on. This is critical because it will significantly change how treatment providers look at mental health and the people who live with diagnostic conditions everyday.

Revising Book on Disorders of the Mind

Dr. Beth Erickson: What Is Posttraumatic Stress Disorder?

The DSM is the clinician's Bible for diagnosing mental illnesses. A. The person has been exposed to a traumatic event in which both of the following were present: (1)The person experienced, witnessed, or was confronted

Publish Date: 03/29/2011 1:26

http://drbetherickson.blogspot.com/2011/03/what-is-posttraumatic-stress-disorder.html

The Clinician's Bible

Good news. After much research (flipping through the DSM-IV) and googling on the internet, and with a little help from my friend, I finally figured out what's wrong with my client. Now, I'm more confident of my assessment report :) On

Publish Date: 02/13/2005 15:21

http://noriyell.blogspot.com/2005/02/clinicians-bible.html

    Filed Under: Abuse , Addiction Therapy , Agoraphobia Therapy , Anger , Anger Management , Anxiety / Stress , Anxiety Therapy , Bereavement-Grief , Bipolar Therapy , BPD Therapy , CBT , Depression , Depression Therapy , Difficult Emotions , Family Treatment , Group Treatment , Identity Issues , Individual Treatment , Insomnia Therapy , Low Self Esteem , Marriage & Relationship , Marriage and Family Therapist , Mood Fluctuation , OCD Therapy , Panic Attack Therapy , Parenting , Pre-Marital Counseling , Professional Counselor , Psychiatry , Psychology , PTSD / Trauma , Reality , REBT , Relationship Problems , Social Phobia Treatment , Social Work , Treatment modality , Trust Issues , Unresolved Childhood Issues , Violence , Work Related Issues Tagged with , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
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Oct

11

Sabotaging Success, but to What End?

Posted By: wbhazel1 on October 11, 2011 at 2:29 pm

This article written by Dr. Richard A. Friedman, MD and published in The New York Times covers a phenomenon which we in the helping professions see all the time. There are individuals who appear by all accounts to study and work very hard to achieve a measure of success only to sabotage it prior to reaching that all elusive goal of success. Many opine that it is due to a fear of success or the unshakable sense that they are not worthy. We probably all know people who play this role out in life, not just our clients, patients or consumers but our family members, neighbors, friends or colleagues. Is it us?

Books, professional journals and magazine articles are all written and read to examine and dissect the self fulfilling prophecy of failure. My viewpoint on human behavior is quite simple: All behavior serves a purpose and provides a sense of satisfaction. If a behavior provides no reward people simply stop doing it.

The task of us helping professionals is to find out what it is that people want and help them achieve it. If their stated position does not equal their demonstrated behavior then something must change. This is in large part the philosophy which supports most therapies. Cognitive behavioral therapy for example is based on the simple premise “change the viewing and you’ll change the doing”. Enjoy the article.

Sabotaging Success, but to What End?

How to not sabotage success

Trent Nelson of Infinite Healing discusses how to not sabotage yourself when you have success in your life.

Darryl Cross – Self Sabotage

Learn to stop self sabotage @ www.HowToStopSelfSabotage.com

    Filed Under: Abuse , Anxiety / Stress , Anxiety Therapy , Depression , Depression Therapy , Difficult Emotions , Identity Issues , Individual Treatment , Low Self Esteem , Mood Fluctuation , Panic Attack Therapy , Professional Counselor , Psychiatry , Psychology , PTSD / Trauma , Reality , Relationship Problems , Social Phobia Treatment , Social Work , Trust Issues , Unresolved Childhood Issues , Violence , Work Related Issues Tagged with , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
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Sep

05

How To Monitor Interpersonal Anxiety In Your Life

Posted By: Douglas Neutrino Xavier on September 5, 2011 at 8:14 am

Have you ever experienced social stress in your life? If so, you know how difficult it can be. Social stress is much more serious than people believe that it is; it can prevent you from not only achieving your most coveted goals and even getting up to answer the door. If you want to get rid of your social stress dilemma, keep reading this article to find out how.

Your diet might have a huge role in the amount of stress that you have. While changing what you eat may not be a complete cure for your problem, it can be helpful all the same. If you consume large amounts of stimulants such as sugar or caffeine, for example, this can trigger anxiety. Try getting rid of these things in your diet as much as you possibly can. Also, be certain that your diet is well balance with foods and nutrients such as vegetables, proteins and carbs. If you eat a lot of starchy foods, then this kind of imbalanced eating will negatively affect your metabolism and bring on anxiety. Taking certain kinds of supplements like multivitamins are excellent for your nervous system and can help you.

Socializing is a skill and like any good skill, you will not improve it unless you work on it. A lot of times people have difficulty with social anxiety will ignore all social events. This will make things even worse. If you can make yourself relive everything social about your daily life, you will start to see a difference. You can begin things by looking people squarely in the eyes and requesting directions when you are at the mall. Also, it would be good to take the first move when it comes to socializing. Do not wait by the phone for people to call you. But, ask one of your friends to go somewhere with you.

People who are prone to stress can trigger stress when attending functions like a party. Instead of trying to steer clear of these outings, you should prepare for them and learn how to cope with them in the proper way. If you are going to an outing like this, it is best to get there early. This will give you a chance to interact with a smaller group of people before it gets busy. If you already know someone, or several people at the event, try to use them to meet some new people. You can talk to party goers about basically anything. Talk about weather, the food, the guests or music. The point is to make the most of the opportunity to socialize rather than hiding in a corner somewhere.

After you have finished reading this article, you should implement some of the techniques, especially if you feel anxiety in a crowd. Remember that every technique and strategy can be used in a slightly different way and modified for each person. In the end, you want to be self-assured and not afraid to deal with life, no matter what type of social stress you encounter.

It is no secret that falling behind a mountain of paperwork may cause all kinds of tension. Whenever you are unable to type very well, this can allow it to be even worse. One thing many people make use of to help remedy this type of tension is some kind of speech recognition software. Check your neighborhood computer software seller to find a answer.

To obtain the absolute best dialog recognition software, you will need to acquire Dragon Naturally Speaking 10. To learn precisely why, make sure you visit the incredible Dragon Naturally Speaking 10 web site right this moment.

    Filed Under: Anxiety / Stress Tagged with , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
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Sep

02

The Many Consequences Of Anxiety

Posted By: Douglas Neutrino Xavier on September 2, 2011 at 8:38 am

People are being affected by many emotional and physical problems due to the stress they are under. If you are getting too many illnesses, or you see yourself aging to quickly, researchers have learned that it is most likely the result of too much stress in your life. This article will help you understand the issue better, by looking at some of the usual effects of stress.

Everyone instinctively tries to reduce stress, but our first reaction isn’t always the best one. Eating too much, overindulging with alcohol, drug taking or reaching for a cigarette are all common responses to stress. None of these, of course, are actually effective ways to manage stress. The effects of such actions actually end up causing more stress, which is why they should be avoided. People who drink too much, for example, will eventually experience health problems, lose their job or have difficulties with their family, and this brings about even more stress. So it’s important to question your automatic reaction to stress, as it may not be the one that’s in your best interest.

It may be hard to believe, but stress has actually been linked to skin problems like psoriasis, acne, eczema and hives. Recent research shows that stress can contribute to skin ailments, hair loss and related issues. Skin inflammations can be worsened by hormonal activities, which can be triggered by stress. If you already have a skin problem, stress can make it worse, causing more pimples, rashes or blisters to break out. While you may need various remedies for your skin, in the long run, managing stress in your life may help to improve the health of your skin. There’s also evidence that stress can trigger hair loss and premature graying of the hair. This is especially likely if you’re losing a lot of hair, or its turning gray all of a sudden, though you should also look for possible medical reasons.

All people respond to stress differently, and that is what makes it interesting. Some people will become stimulated by a distressing situation, while others will not be affected at all, where a third person will become completely stressed out. Additionally, one person may feel stressed out for a few minutes and then forget about it, while someone else may carry it around for days. This is a key to understanding how to cope better with stress. Events that cause stress don’t have to change for you to be less stressed out, but your response will need to change. What makes stress such a bad thing, is not that stressful situations happen, but what the reaction people have to them.

The more people become educated about stress, the longer the list of unhealthy conditions that it causes are becoming known. It seems obvious that stress has long-term effects on health, but the seriousness of stress is not agreed upon by all doctors or scientists. Stress and relaxation don’t seem to go together, so why not find ways to relax, rather than stress out. Getting rid of stress will not only give you better health, but also longer life.

Many people understand that performing paperwork may cause a great deal of anxiety. In today’s hectic atmosphere, it’s not hard to get behind. Being not too proficient at typing can make it even more difficult. Why not consider benefiting from speech recognition computer software? Seek advice from your local software shop for additional information.

To acquire the definite best speech recognition software, you will need to obtain Dragon Naturally Speaking 10. To determine why, remember to pay a visit to the incredible Dragon Naturally Speaking 10 web site right this moment.

    Filed Under: Anxiety / Stress Tagged with , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
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Aug

28

What You Ought To Realize About Stress Remedies

Posted By: Douglas Neutrino Xavier on August 28, 2011 at 8:10 am

There are many ways to treat stress, and in some cases stress medications are recommended to alleviate the symptoms. This is not a decision you can reach easily, though, as most stress medications require a prescription so you have to talk to your doctor or therapist first. Let’s explore some of the most important questions surrounding stress medications to help you decide if this might be the right approach for you.

Because of the problems associated with certain stress medications, new ones are always being introduced; Birspirone is an example of a recently developed one. This is considered to be a safer and more gentle alternative to drugs such as Valium and other tranquilizer. Serotonin levels in the brain are known to affect mood and stress levels, and Buspirone causes the brain to produce more of this chemical. It’s also less likely to cause drowsiness or memory loss, which are some of the undesirable side effects of many sedatives and other anti-stress medications. Additionally, it’s less likely to cause addiction in users, another problem common with this type of medication. This isn’t to say that Buspirone is perfect or has no potential side effects at all -some of the listed ones are dizziness, upset stomach and nausea.

Because some stress medications are potentially addictive, you should honestly ask yourself if this could be a problem for you. For various reasons, including genetics, some people are more prone to becoming addicted to medications. Since there are many types of stress medication, not all of them habit forming, it’s important to talk about any such concerns with your doctor ahead of time. If stress medications are only used for a limited amount of time, and in conjunction with other treatments such as therapy, there’s less of a chance of becoming dependent on them. Your doctor can help you decide if stress medication is right for you, but the danger of becoming addicted is something some people must keep in mind.

Finding the right stress medication is something you have to do with your doctor’s help, and both of you should carefully consider your background, the type of stress you’re experiencing and other such factors. Sometimes, for example, stress is accompanied by depression and if this is severe, an antidepressant might be recommended. If your stress is causing any other health problems, like high blood pressure, treating your physical symptoms may be the priority you have to focus on first. You should also keep in mind that stress medication isn’t always the best answer, as there are various natural remedies, relaxation techniques and other ways to deal with stress.

In conclusion, always talk to your doctor before taking any medications whether prescribed or herbal. A common problem that most people have today is stress management, something you should get help for especially if it is becoming unbearable. Never fear as your stress can be handled using many of the treatments that are available.

One particular large reason for stress in today’s culture is an overabundance of paperwork. Regardless of what kind of company you’re in, it is easy to fall behind. This could cause a great deal of anxiety if you cannot type very fast. One option would be to get some speech recognition software. This can help a good deal. Talk with your local software shop for more information.

To acquire the overall best speech recognition computer software, you will need to get Dragon Naturally Speaking 10. To determine the reason why, please visit the awesome Dragon Naturally Speaking 10 web page at this time.

    Filed Under: Anxiety / Stress Tagged with , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
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